What We Do

No, we are not a bank!

Our mission is to serve to empower others in transforming distressed properties into community assets.

We are a local, governmental, 501(c)3 nonprofit organization—your friends and community members—working to acquire vacant, abandoned, or dilapidated properties throughout Omaha where we will then partner with our community to transform them into positive neighborhood assets. These properties have been rejected by the open market, allowing us to eliminate their liabilities and transfer them to new owners in a manner most supportive of local needs and priorities.

 

Read our Strategic Plan2021 Annual Report

Policies & Procedures

OMLB RESOURCE GUIDE

We are often asked about the day-to-day work of OMLB from curious residents and community leaders. Here, we address our most frequently asked questions.

What is the Omaha Municipal Landbank?

We are a quasi-public nonprofit organization that acquires, maintains, and sells abandoned and vacant properties for productive use. Our mission is to empower the transformation of distressed properties into community assets.

How was the Land Bank established?

An overriding public need to confront the dilemma of vacant, abandoned and tax-delinquent properties prompted the Nebraska Legislature to pass the Nebraska Municipal Land Bank Act in 2013. The Nebraska Land Bank Act allowed the City of Omaha to create the Omaha Municipal Land Bank, as a governmental nonprofit organization in 2014.

How is the Land Bank governed?

The Land Bank is led by an Executive Director and staff that works under the supervision of the OMLB Board of Directors. Our board is appointed by the Mayor of Omaha and consists of seven voting members from each city council district and a few non-voting members.

How does the Land Bank acquire properties?

The Land Bank acquires property through various methods, including tax foreclosures, donations, and purchases. Most of our properties are acquired through tax foreclosures. Once a property is acquired, the Land Bank works on removing any title encumbrances prior to listing it for sale.

How does OMLB maintain its properties?

We hire various local maintenance vendors to maintain our vacant lots. Our vendors help keep our properties secured, mowed, and free of trash. If you are interested in becoming a maintenance vendor or need to report a complaint about a property, please contact us at [email protected].

Where can I find a list of OMLB properties?

All properties available for sale can be found on our website or through the following link: Omaha Land Bank Properties.

How do I apply to purchase properties?

An application must be filled out and completed for each property. All property sales and applications are received and approved by our Board of Directors. Each application must clearly identify your proposed plans and how you intend to fund the purchase and development of the property.

 Applications are available on our website or at our office during normal business hours. Please contact us to schedule an appointment prior to visiting our office.

What does the application process involve?

The application process begins with the submission of a completed application. Once complete, your application is presented to our Dispositions Committee for review. If approved, your application is then be presented to our Board of Directors for their final vote of approval. Our application process may take 30-45 days depending on how soon your application is completed. Our Board of Directors also meets once a month. For a detailed timeline of our application process, please review this chart: OMLB Disposition Process.

 Applications are available on our website or at our office during normal business hours. Please contact us to schedule an appointment prior to visiting our office.

How can I become involved with OMLB?

The Land Bank operates various programs that welcome community involvement and partnerships. A list of our current programs can be found on our website.

How do I learn more about getting a permit for a residential property?

Did you know that the City of Omaha has an online Residential Guide for building permits?

Use this link to learn more.

Land Bank Programs